Warner's TheoBlog

Thoughts from a disciple who writes


5 Comments

Let there be light!

The funny things about light is that we cannot see it. Yet, without it we cannot see.

Before anything else was made by God, there was light. The Creation of light on the first day was necessary for there to be the Creation of everything else that followed, including the sun, moon and stars (that were not created in the Genesis narrative until the fourth day).

It may be that the Creation of light before the creation of the celestial orbs gives credence to the concept that Genesis is an allegory, but that is a discussion for another day. It seems clear that the light here is not the light of physics, but the light of truth. The true light is the light by which human beings navigate through life. Our decisions in life are shaped very much by the way that we see the world and the light by which we see it.

“God is light; in Him there is no darkness at all. If we claim to have fellowship with Him yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not live by the truth. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus, His Son, purifies us form all sin” (1 John 1:5-7)

Simply put, light is the presence of God and the dark is His absence.

Christmas is the coming of light, once more, into the world. The light that humanity turned away from in our pride moves evidently and clearly into our sight. It illuminates the world and makes everything perceivable by the presence of God. Jesus is the light of God’s presence in the world. This light brings life. A re-Creation of humanity so that the light of God becomes the central reality to our existence once more and the union of His presence is open to us. Jesus’ birth into this world brings new life; full life; God’s life.

“Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, but the darkness has not understood it” (John 1:3-5)

This is my Christmas cogitation part 3 – perhaps you would like to read the others?